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VictorVVictorV 

URGNT Salesforce Bandwidth Requirement

Hello,

we are implementing salesforce but the thing is that we want to know what is the bandwidth minimum that salesforce require to work and what bandwidth requires salesforce to work optimal?.

Thanks.

Best Answer chosen by Admin (Salesforce Developers) 
BrendanOCBrendanOC

Victor - The amount of bandwidth required is going to vary based on how your users use Salesforce, how many fields you have in each record, attachments size, etc.

 

Having said that, here are some general estimates:  Average page size is roughly 90kb (your mileage may vary.)  You can test this by Saving a page locally and looking at its size.  Several elements of the page (CSS, JS, Images, etc.) will be cached after first view, so that should reduce average page size.  Salesforce uses GZIP compression on page transfer to increase speed and consume less bandwidth (you can see this by looking at the raw HTTP response headers.)   This can reduce bandwidth by up to a factor of 6, or 15kb per user per page.(again, YMMV)

 

The intial login and loading process will take the most bandwidth per user, but once users are logged in, you can run some simple tests using a packet sniffer, inspecting your router net flows, or looking at your firewall logs.  After requesting a new page, most users are going to stay on that page for a little while, reading the record, updating the record, etc.  I would recommend collecting some metrics on average page views per user per hour, and average page size. 

 

You can then calculate bandwidth as follows:

Bandwidth = Avg. Page Size(in kilobits) * Number of Users / (Seconds between page views + Page load time)

 

***Remember bandwidth is calculate in BITS not BYTES.  If a compressed Salesforce page has a size of 15 kilobytes, that's 120 kilobits of bandwidth.

 

As an example, let's say Page Size = 120kilobits  Users = 10, Seconds between page views = 120 (2 minutes) and page load time = 2 seconds

 

120 * 10 / (120 + 2) = 9.83kbps of bandwidth.

 

Of course, if all 10 people open a new page at the same time, it will be much slower.  If only 1 person opens a new page while the other 9 are doing something else, it should be much faster.

 

Hope that helps!

 

Regards,

Brendan

 

 

 

All Answers

BrendanOCBrendanOC

Victor - The amount of bandwidth required is going to vary based on how your users use Salesforce, how many fields you have in each record, attachments size, etc.

 

Having said that, here are some general estimates:  Average page size is roughly 90kb (your mileage may vary.)  You can test this by Saving a page locally and looking at its size.  Several elements of the page (CSS, JS, Images, etc.) will be cached after first view, so that should reduce average page size.  Salesforce uses GZIP compression on page transfer to increase speed and consume less bandwidth (you can see this by looking at the raw HTTP response headers.)   This can reduce bandwidth by up to a factor of 6, or 15kb per user per page.(again, YMMV)

 

The intial login and loading process will take the most bandwidth per user, but once users are logged in, you can run some simple tests using a packet sniffer, inspecting your router net flows, or looking at your firewall logs.  After requesting a new page, most users are going to stay on that page for a little while, reading the record, updating the record, etc.  I would recommend collecting some metrics on average page views per user per hour, and average page size. 

 

You can then calculate bandwidth as follows:

Bandwidth = Avg. Page Size(in kilobits) * Number of Users / (Seconds between page views + Page load time)

 

***Remember bandwidth is calculate in BITS not BYTES.  If a compressed Salesforce page has a size of 15 kilobytes, that's 120 kilobits of bandwidth.

 

As an example, let's say Page Size = 120kilobits  Users = 10, Seconds between page views = 120 (2 minutes) and page load time = 2 seconds

 

120 * 10 / (120 + 2) = 9.83kbps of bandwidth.

 

Of course, if all 10 people open a new page at the same time, it will be much slower.  If only 1 person opens a new page while the other 9 are doing something else, it should be much faster.

 

Hope that helps!

 

Regards,

Brendan

 

 

 

This was selected as the best answer
CloudSteer Technology for SFDCCloudSteer Technology for SFDC

Thanks for the amazing response.

DK123DK123

Hi,

 

We are interested in this same issue as we are deploying to the developing world.  When you download a 'complete' web page from SF, the size of a typical page is closer to 1.5 MB (including CSS and js files), so, the pages are actually much bigger.   HTML alone is usually .25 to .5 MB.

 

Also, the calculation is incorrect: to get a 120kbit page to load in 2 seconds, you need a lot more than 10kbit/s (even with one user)!

 

Knowing this, without any formulas, you can assume needing at least .5 MB/s to comfortably load a page in a few seconds with very few users.

 

Dirk