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cdylancartercdylancarter 

Projects, Trails, Campsites, and Accounts?

As I'm working my way through Trailhead to reassure myself, learn some new tricks, and train for ADM201, I have to admit I feel like I'm going all over the place. First we make a Fundraiser object, then WHOOSH we have to make a Garage? Oh okay, next challenge, we're making trails. Trails on Trailhead. I love it. And then Campsites, great, camping and hiking, all related. I'm feeling good.

A few challenges later? Project management! But only for a second because now we're talking role hierarchy for a sales organization. And by the time we hit workflows we're escalating cases and I haven't gone hiking in way too long. I'm making a Flow to create Opportunities, I haven't even gone outside! 

It'd be AMAZING if Trailhead gave me the feeling of actually creating something full featured, like the workbooks do. It's very distracting to be all over the map, and my schema is getting packed! The camping/hiking/trail app sounds like a lot of fun, and lets us as admins in training break away from the monotony of sales processes (especially when Trailhead isn't even actually teaching us those features!)
Best Answer chosen by cdylancarter
Sandeep BhanotSandeep Bhanot
Its a fair question. There are 2 main reasons why the challenges in Trailhead don't build on each other and/or use a consistent app scenario/use case.
1) As the previous user pointed out, Trailhead was designed such that you can pick and choose whatever 'path' works for your learning objectives. The Trails are obviously the guided path that we recommend most users follow, but we also recognize that some folks might just want to learn about a specifc topic (e.g. Apex Testing or Process Automation) and not want to go thr. an entire trail. That's whay each module in Trailhead is self-contained and does not assume that the user has completed the previous modules(s) in the trail (though we do recommend it for Salesforce newbies). The challenges therefore have to be self-contained.
2) Even if we wanted to follow a consistent use case/scenario for all challenges, its pretty much impossible to come up with a generic enough use case that can be extended indefinately as we continue to add more content to Trailhead. If we pick a single use case, at some point, the challenges may also start to conflict with each other and users would required multiple DE Orgs to complete them all.

All that being said, I completely agree that having a consistent use case (like our workbooks) can improve the learning experience in many cases. To address that, we're working on a new feature for Trailhead called 'Projects'. Projects will support a new learning modality in Trailhead whereby a user can build an app from scratch and each step will build on the previous one. Think of them as doing a workbook inside Trailhead, except that you'll get to verfiy each step of the Project in a DE Org to make sure that you did it right. 

Love to get your feedback on whether Projects will address your concern. Thanks again for sending us your feedback.

Sandeep Bhanot
Salesforce.com

All Answers

sfdcdevsfdcdev
Trailhead has been made to teach you a single topic at a time.The topics have been deliberately isolated so that anyone can jump from one topic to another without requiring to complete the previous one.
Sandeep BhanotSandeep Bhanot
Its a fair question. There are 2 main reasons why the challenges in Trailhead don't build on each other and/or use a consistent app scenario/use case.
1) As the previous user pointed out, Trailhead was designed such that you can pick and choose whatever 'path' works for your learning objectives. The Trails are obviously the guided path that we recommend most users follow, but we also recognize that some folks might just want to learn about a specifc topic (e.g. Apex Testing or Process Automation) and not want to go thr. an entire trail. That's whay each module in Trailhead is self-contained and does not assume that the user has completed the previous modules(s) in the trail (though we do recommend it for Salesforce newbies). The challenges therefore have to be self-contained.
2) Even if we wanted to follow a consistent use case/scenario for all challenges, its pretty much impossible to come up with a generic enough use case that can be extended indefinately as we continue to add more content to Trailhead. If we pick a single use case, at some point, the challenges may also start to conflict with each other and users would required multiple DE Orgs to complete them all.

All that being said, I completely agree that having a consistent use case (like our workbooks) can improve the learning experience in many cases. To address that, we're working on a new feature for Trailhead called 'Projects'. Projects will support a new learning modality in Trailhead whereby a user can build an app from scratch and each step will build on the previous one. Think of them as doing a workbook inside Trailhead, except that you'll get to verfiy each step of the Project in a DE Org to make sure that you did it right. 

Love to get your feedback on whether Projects will address your concern. Thanks again for sending us your feedback.

Sandeep Bhanot
Salesforce.com
This was selected as the best answer
cdylancartercdylancarter
Sandeep,

Thanks for the thoughtful response. I understand your point about them needing to be self-contained (though I'ms ure there's SOME work around somewhere ;) ). Projects sound like a GREAT program and also a great learning model for me, and I look forward to them.
Zachary JeansZachary Jeans
I'm of the mind that having a consistent theme is important to the learning process. And whether you start in Force.com or with the Lightning as isolated units, it ought to have a consistent theme. You can do inventory in a Trails and Camping Theme. You can do sales, and data security, and you name it... all in a consistent theme.