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Joshua ItwaruJoshua Itwaru 

System.LimitException: Your runAllTests request is using too many DB resources

Our production deployments using the (ant) force migration tool have been consistently failing recently, after executing some percentage of our tests, with the error:

System.LimitException: Your runAllTests request is using too many DB resources.

All of our tests are @isTest(seeAllData=false) and we recreate all test data from scratch using factory classes at the beginning of each test method.

We contacted Salesforce support, and after a multiple calls, different people, and a lot of time, they told us that in addition to the per-transaction governor limits, there are undocumented limits that are shared amongst all executed code during the course of a runAllTests request:
  • The DML statement limit is 350,000
  • The SOQL statement limit is 450,000
Salesforce suggested that we use the @testSetup annotation to setup data in our tests (we have not been using that annotation), and this would help us in avoiding hitting the above limits. I wrote a small unit test to verify that this would actually help with limits, but the unit test suggests that the DML statements accrued in a @testSetup annotated method do indeed count in each testmethod.
@isTest(seeAllData=false)
public class TestSalesforceTestSetupDMLCount {

    @testSetup static void setup(){
        // Assert that no DMLs have occurred yet
        system.assertEquals(0, Limits.getDMLStatements());
        
        // Perform 4 DMLs
        for(Integer i=0; i<4; i++){
            insert new Account(Name='Test' + i);
        }
        
        // Assert that 4 DMLs have been performed
        system.assertEquals(4, Limits.getDMLStatements());
    }
    
    public static testmethod void testDmlCount1(){
		// THIS ASSERTION FAILS
        system.assertNotEquals(4, Limits.getDMLStatements());
    }
    
    public static testmethod void testDmlCount2(){
        // THIS ASSERTION FAILS
        system.assertNotEquals(4, Limits.getDMLStatements());
    }
}

The 2 testmethods fail because Limits.getDMLStatements() returns 4. The question is, regarding the runAllTests DML statement limit of 350,000, does the above test contribute 4 DML statements or does it contribute 12 DML statements (4 for setup(), 4 for testDmlCount1(), 4 for testDmlCount2())?

This is obviously something that only Salesforce can answer, but I at least want this issue documented somewhere, and will provide updates as we get answers from Salesforce.
KevinBrKevinBr

I beleive I understand the issue here.

The @testSetup annoation runs firstly, and only once, with any data created accessible to the test methods,
Each test method above, then, essentially has no dml statements.

See this for more info:
https://developer.salesforce.com/docs/atlas.en-us.apexcode.meta/apexcode/apex_testing_testsetup_using.htm

Paweł WoźniakPaweł Woźniak
Hi Joshua,

Have you managed to workaround this error? I am getting that too and there is very little information about it on the Internet.
sfdcfoxsfdcfox
@testSetup methods preserve their governor limits for each unit test. I feel like this is a bug, but that's how it works. To make @testSetup have separate limits, use Test.startTest():
 
@isTest(seeAllData=false)
public class TestSalesforceTestSetupDMLCount {

    @testSetup static void setup(){
        // Assert that no DMLs have occurred yet
        system.assertEquals(0, Limits.getDMLStatements());
        Test.startTest(); // Suspend unit test governor limits //
        // Perform 4 DMLs
        for(Integer i=0; i<4; i++){
            insert new Account(Name='Test' + i);
        }
        
        // Assert that 4 DMLs have been performed
        system.assertEquals(4, Limits.getDMLStatements());
    }
    
    public static testmethod void testDmlCount1(){
		// THIS ASSERTION NOW PASSES
        system.assertNotEquals(4, Limits.getDMLStatements());
    }
    
    public static testmethod void testDmlCount2(){
        // THIS ASSERTION ALSO PASSES
        system.assertNotEquals(4, Limits.getDMLStatements());
    }
}
In answer to the original question, a DML statement is a DML statement. You cannot use the Limits method to determine how many cumulative DML you've used, or even how many actual DML were actually performed. For example, if you use asynchronous code and then Test.stopTest(), your unit test cannot then determine what the final DML usage was for the asynchronous code, unless that code actually stores the results somewhere (a static variable) to verify the values.